Harmonie's Look on Fashion

Posts Tagged ‘Boston

Part of Boston Fashion Week 2010 was yesterday’s event The Launch. Five emerging designers were presenting their line to professionals and curious fashion lovers.  Overexcited ambiance backstage but an overall success and pleasure of the eyes!

Enjoy!

Models waiting for hair & make-up:

Getting ready for the first show: Sara Marhamo‘s looks.

Sara Marhamo’s looks and runway line-up!

Designer Sara Marhamo:

Designer Sara Marhamo:

Designer Sara Marhamo:

Designer Sara Marhamo:

One of Samira Vargas‘s look of a collection inspired by drums.

Another look of Samira Vargas’s line and the designer.

Samira Vargas’s finale dress:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya and her black-only collection:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Lovely details from Aey Hotarwaisaya’s collection:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Aey Hotarwaisaya:

Designer Laura Kane with a collection of evening dresses:

Designer Laura Kane:

Designer Laura Kane:

Designer Laura Kane:

Designer Laura Kane:

Designer Laura Kane:

Designer Laura Kane:

My friend Victoria Dominguez Bagu was presenting her collection as well. I was too busy dressing the models to have any backstage pictures so I wanted you to see the pictures from her photo shoot by Kevin Day.

Victoria Dominguez Bagu photographed by Kevin Day

Victoria Dominguez Bagu photographed by Kevin Day

Victoria Dominguez Bagu photographed by Kevin Day

Victoria Dominguez Bagu photographed by Kevin Day

Victoria Dominguez Bagu will have another show open to the public on Friday October 1st at the Copley Mall and you will find the complete schedule of Boston Fashion Week 2010 on this website.

Creativity and style were definitely overwhelming during this afternoon. Special thanks to the designers, models and organizing staff for making Boston Fashion Week happen!

Lisa Foster is one of the several entrepreneurs that I managed to meet through Northeastern University.

As a college and high-school English professor, Foster had never imagined that she will be an entrepreneur one day. But then, she left the U.S. to live in Australia with her familly for six month. Early after her arrival, she went grocery shopping and at the cashier, she was asked if she wanted a bag. Hum hum… It was in 2005 and at that time, nobody in the U.S. would imagine leaving a store without a plastic/paper bag. Well, Lisa did what the other Australian shoppers had done already, she bought a few reusable bags made of textile materials. This trip to Australia raised Lisa’s awareness about the damages of paper/plastic bags and showed that actual solutions do exist.

Like many other new entrepreneurs before her, Lisa came back to her country  with an idea inspired from abroad. Still, it was clearly difficult to find the required partners to manufacture and sell reusable bags in the U.S. I am convinced that this reality faces every entrepreneur that tries to create a new market. So Lisa partnered with the same manufacturer that build the Australian bags and took care of the distribution in the U.S. herself.

It took approximately one year to build up the operations and then, Lisa decided to dedicate her skills full-time to her business and dream. 

So far, 1 Bag at a Time has sold 10 million reusable bags within the U.S.

During our interview, Lisa mentionned that her bags are manufactured in China in factories where she clearly put a point on working conditions. No child are working on the factory and people from the same familly are kept together. A minimum wage is guaranteed and no penalties are taken out of the salary (salary penalties are extremely frequent in China e.g. someone who did not clean his work space may loose 5% of his daily wage). Instead of punishing people that do not work fast enough, incentives are created to encourage productivity. Over the years, only the best people come back after the Chinese New Year Break. Manufacturing the bags in China is a bit controversial to me because the transportation environmental footprint is not negligible but I am not sure either about where our plastic/paper bags are manufactured. 

This interview with Lisa pointed out great things from an entrepreneurial standpoint:

– Entrepreneur should believe in their ideas and find a way to make them work. Remember that it takes time to create a market.

Keep your eyes open. Great ideas are everywhere and traveling is surely a great way to get inspired from other habits and behaviors.

It is not easy. Lisa pointed out how difficult it is to run a company full-time and then keep the familly running on evenings and week-ends. But it is possible.

Get inspired!

On the list of the top things to do in Boston this Spring, don’t miss Donna Rosenthal’s exhibition at Judi Rotenberg Gallery on Newbury Street.

Rosenthal’s mini garments (mostly dresses but including men’s suits) are made of paper or knitted metallic wires.

Working with paper, Rosenthal cleverly uses the prints and the colors of the actual material to create those uncommon outfits.

Working with metallic thread, Rosenthal knits or wraps the material to build the shape of those airy fancy mini dresses.

The exhibition takes place until April 24 and is open to the public. If you go, let us know what you think!

On March 22nd, the Harris Center for Education and Advocacy in Eating Disorders at Massachusetts General Hospital organized its 2010 Annual Public Forum at Harvard Business School.

This year’s topic was focused on health and wellness in the world of fashion

Dr. David Herzog, who managed eating disorders research for thirty years at MGH opened the Forum. He insisted on the importance of early intervention to cure individuals with eating disorders. As the moderator of a panel discussion entitled “The Beauty of Health: Resizing the Sample Size” hosted by the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) on February 9, 2010, Dr Herzog found the discussion encouraging and hopes that this burning issue will be always more spoken of.

Anna Wintour, Editor in Chief of Vogue,  insisted on the fact that the CFDA’s health initiative created a public dialog. Among others, this initiative  sets minimum age requirements and maximum working hours rules for models. Wintour made it a principle to choose healthy-looking model for Vogue. However, she underlined a main issue that editors are facing during fittings and photo shoots. Indeed, samples are almost always made on one size, the runway size. But the runway sizes are too small and thus healthy model at Vogue can’t fit most of the samples. It is a vicious circle that is accepting/encouraging underweighted models into the bad direction. Anna Wintour clearly supports the CFDA initiative and the idea that the sample size needs to be resized in a near future. Older, bigger models would then get the prestige that they lost to Hollywood celebrities back and become star models again. Wintour already noticed a slight change. Miuccia Prada chose Doutzen Kroes, a controversial model who was often said to be too fat,  for her Fall 2010 runway show. Marc Jacobs chose Elle Macpherson, the super model of the 1990s, for his Louis Vuitton Fall 2010 show.

Michael Kors, then shared his experience of runway shows. He underlines that women who buy designer clothes are often over 30, that shows should adress real women again and that the visual has to match the reality. In the first and only achieved results of the discussion, Michael Kors stated that he will no longer book models under 16 and that girls under 18 should have adult supervision to support them. Kors put an emphasis on the responsibility of designers, editors, … so that “clothes (will still be) made to make you feel the best version of you“.

Natalia Vodianova then offered a testimony of her life as a model. As a victim of eating disorders herself, she thinks that recognizing the disease in the first sign of recovery. To help models, she encourages organizations or model agencies to provide information, to explain how the body reacts to food supply, to support and guide models to therapies, groups and psychological support.

Within the next three years and the new edition of the Harris Center Health Problem, the three pannelists agreed on the fact that the debate about health and fashion is very likely to accelerate.

Although very little concrete initiatives have risen during this Forum, the discussion clearly restated that the dialog about health in fashion is open for good. As part of the fashion industry, from now on, we are all aware of the issues on models’ health and of the consequences for all the people influenced by image they see from the fashion industry on a daily basis. 

On Friday March 5th, I got the chance to meet Jay Calderin at the School of Fashion Design in Boston and hear him speak about his first book published in December 2009.

Jay’s passion for fashion started as early as in his High School years when the child from the Bronx organized his first runway shows. He moved to Boston in 1989 and initiated the first Boston Fashion Week in 1995. Since then, he is considered as a corner stone of the fashion industry in Boston. His 10 years experience in New York, his work with high-end fashion houses such as Valentino or Kenzo, his own collection lines certainly contribute to Jay’s legitimacy. Jay is also the regional director of Fashion Group International in Boston

The book is written for professionals who need to keep in mind the big picture of their work. Through a large research work, Jay managed to gather “everything that (he) wanted to know or couldn’t find“. Jay’s book is very strategic and tends to help designers to organize themselves, to find inspiration through diverse sources (arts or technology) and to form a powerful message. The book is published by Rockport Publishers and can be found on Amazon.com

About Boston Fashion Week, Jay told us that Boston needed to differentiate itself from New York, London or Paris. Boston should use its smart environment to come up with a unique perspective about fashion. Expensive fashion shows can be replaced by video or photos exhbitions. Technologies and social networking is maybe the new way to be creative for Fashion Week. Partnerships with architects, graphic designers or web designers help to understand how pieces are structured. In a word, Boston could be the Smart Fashion Week. Stay tunned for Boston Fashion Week 2010 from September 24th to October 1st !

Congratulations Jay!